Not My Own

“Ye are not your own,” is an idea I came across recently when researching Charlotte Mason’s thoughts on play and physical training. Miss Mason starts this dialogue by pointing to an alternative, more prevalent thought among persons, which is 'Ye are your own,' ...and free to do what you like with your own.” At no point has this thought been more prevalent than it is today. My life is my own, my body is my own, my mind is my own, my pursuits are my own, are all underlying beliefs driving our choices and those of our children. What if we are wrong? What if we are not our own? What if our bodies and minds haven’t been given to us for our purposes and to fulfill our desires? Alternatively, I was struck by how potent an idea it is to consider oneself as belonging, exclusively, to the God that knit us together in the womb, rather than exclusively to self. How much more meaningful would faith, family, friendship, education and physical activity be if the thought that we are not our own was driving our desired outcome. If the glory of our creator was the end, rather than the fulfillment of “I want, therefore I must have.” What would we choose to do and where would we choose to be if “I am not my own” was a deeply rooted truth guiding our every move? What would our work be characterized by? Our fitness? Our diet? Our concern and care for others? Our school choice? Our corporate worship? Our family time?

Something to think about...